LiteSpeed Cache for WordPress Settings: Advanced

OFF

Object Cache is disabled by default. Select ON to enable it and then configure it via the settings described below. You can learn more about object cache here.

Method

Memcached

If your object cache is Memcached or LSCMC, set Method to Memcached. If your object cache is Redis, set Method to Redis.

Host

localhost

The hostname or IP address used by your Memcached or LSMCD object cache. The default setting should work fine for you, if your Memcached is set up via a TCP connection. If you are using a UNIX socket, Host should be set to /path/to/memcached.sock. (Substitute the actual path used for your installation.)

Port

11211

The port number used by your object cache. The default setting should work fine for you, if your Memcached is set up via a TCP connection. If you are using a UNIX socket, Port should be set to 0.

Default Object Lifetime

360

The TTL for items stored in the object cache. We recommend using a relatively short time in order to avoid stale results.

Status

An informational area to let you know the status of your external object cache. If you are getting errors here, please see How to Debug your Oject Cache Setup.

Username

Only available when SASL is installed and the object caching method is Memcached.

Password

Specify the password used when connecting.

Redis Database ID

Database to be used. This field only appears when the object caching method is Redis.

Global Groups

users
userlogins
usermeta
user_meta
site-transient
site-options
site-lookup
blog-lookup
blog-details
rss
global-posts
blog-id-cache

A list of groups that should be cached at the network level.

Do Not Cache Groups

comment
counts
plugins

A list of groups that should not be included in object cache.

Persistent Connection

ON

If enabled, the connection is kept alive in order to make Memcached faster.

Cache WP Admin

OFF

If enabled, WordPress admin will be sped up, but at the risk of occasionally retrieving stale data from the object cache.

Store Transients

ON

When Cache WP Admin is set to OFF, transients have nowhere to go. Without transients, you don't receive server status notices (such as XXXX has been completed successfully.). Enable Store Transients to get server notices when Cache WP Admin is disabled.

off

When Browser Cache is enabled, static files (such as images, css, and videos) are stored locally on the user's device to make subsequent retrieval much faster. You can learn more about this setting here.

2592000

The amount of time, in seconds, that files will be stored in the browser cache before expiring. Minimum is 30 seconds. Recommended value is 2592000 (which is 30 days).

on

This option can be off if another cache plugin is used for non full page caching purposes. For example, the other plugin can be a db cache, minification, etc.

Note: If another cache plugin is not being used, it is recommended to leave this on.

empty string

This option should be used to configure a unique login cookie if multiple web applications with a LSCache plugin are used in a single virtual host.

An example login cookie is _wp_login_1

a list of recommended hooks

LSCWP executes a “Purge All” action on the cache when certain WordPress hooks are run. You can change the purge behavior for your LSCWP installation by changing these hooks. For example, if you don't want to purge the cache every time you create a new tag or category, remove the create_term hook from the list. Or, if you do want to purge the cache every time a comment is posted on your site, you could add the comment_post hook.

LiteSpeed recommends you Purge All when the following hooks are run:

switch_theme
wp_create_nav_menu
wp_update_nav_menu
wp_delete_nav_menu
create_term
edit_terms
delete_term
add_link
edit_link
delete_link

See the WordPress Code Reference for a list of available hooks. Many plugins also have their own hooks that you can reference, as well.

OFF

When a site uses both HTTP and HTTPS, conflicts with the login cookie may occur. Cookies are based on domain name, regardless of protocol, however an HTTP connection can't read a cookie that was saved with HTTPS. And so, if a user logs in with HTTPS and then connects with HTTP, the user will be treated as a guest, and not as a logged-in user.

When you enable this option, the login cookie is saved as an HTTP cookie at all times, regardless of the protocol used to access the page. This ensures that the login cookie is always accessible to both HTTP and HTTPS connections.

OFF

It takes time for a user to click a link. First they hover over it, then they depress the mouse button, and then, only after the button is released, is the link considered “clicked” and the new page loaded. With Instant Click enabled, the page begins to load as soon as the user hovers over the link. By the time the mouse button is released, enough of the page has been loaded that the display can seem almost instant.

Be aware, though, that this function will generate extra requests to the server, if your visitors do a lot of link hovering without clicking. As such, it has the potential to impact server load.

  • Admin
  • Last modified: 2019/04/12 18:39
  • by Lisa Clarke